Earth Systems Science

Jonathan Mitchell

I am interested in understanding planetary phenomena. My current research is focused on understanding surface-atmosphere interactions on Titan, superrotating atmospheres, tidal interactions of synchronous satellites, and Earth’s paleoclimate. I am an associate professor in the Department of Earth & Space Sciences and the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at UCLA.

Samantha Stevenson

My research goals relate to understanding how large-scale climate variability responds to changes in climate, how we can improve our inferences of those changes using paleoclimate archives, and using that information to improve the representation of climate variability in climate models.

Alyson Santoro

My research focuses on microbes involved in nutrient cycling in the ocean, especially of the element nitrogen. I am interested in cultivating new microbes and discovering novel ways of tracking their activity. This research combines laboratory experiments with field observations, and to date has used genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and stable isotope geochemistry as tools to uncover the activity of microbes in the mesopelagic ocean. A particular focus of the lab is the marine archaea, a largely uncultured group of microbes.

Helene Gardner

Dr. Gardner's research is in environmental chemistry, pollution and toxicology. She received her Ph.D. in environmental toxicology from the University of Rochester in 1987. There she worked on projects involving the covalent binding of diethylstilbestrol (DES) to maternal and fetal tissues, the female reproductive effects of uranyl fluoride, the nephrotoxicity of inhaled uranyl fluoride, and the effects of inhaled nitrogen dioxide on vitamin E transport and tissue distribution.

Greg Husak

Greg has been working with the Climate Hazards Group since its inception, starting as a graduate student and now as Assistant Researcher and Principal Investigator. Greg received his MA from UCSB looking at global landcover maps under Dr. Jack Estes. This Masters research led him to the FEWS NET work, and satellite estimates of rainfall. His PhD work focused on developing statistical tools for leveraging existing products to provide improved rainfall monitoring and forecasting.

Carrie Kappel

Carrie Kappel is a marine conservation biologist and community ecologist, she received her Ph.D. from Stanford University. Major themes of her work include quantifying the ways humans depend upon and impact marine species, habitats, and ecosystems; understanding the spatial distribution of ecological and human components of ecosystems in order to inform conservation and management; and developing ways to integrate biophysical and socioeconomic data to support environmental decision-making in coastal ecosystems.

Peter Homyak

Ecosystem ecology/ biogeochemistry including:

- Watershed biogeochemistry/Ecosystem nutrient cycling/Global change

- Application of stable isotope techniques in watershed science

- Linking biogeochemical cycles across the terrestrial-aquatic interface

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