Environmental Information Management

Louis Graup

My research aims to understand the feedbacks between hydrology, drought and vegetation under changing climate regimes. I use this knowledge to explore forest management techniques that will enhance water resource availability for downstream communities.

Daniel Sousa

I am a postdoc working with the La Kretz Center at Sedgwick Reserve. My research interests lie at the intersection of geophysical data analysis and conservation ecology. My research primarily uses optical and thermal satellite image time series, in conjunction with field measurements, to better understand spatiotemporal landscape patterns.

Noah Molotch

My research and teaching interests are focused on the processes controlling hydrologic fluxes in semi-arid regions. My research projects utilize ground-based observations, remote sensing, and computational modeling to obtain comprehensive understanding of hydrological processes; in particular the distribution of snowmelt, soil moisture and streamflow. Additional projects aim at developing techniques for scaling hydrological processes and for designing ground-based observation networks tailored for integration with remote sensing and modeling.

Roland Knapp

The general goal of my research is to understand how natural and anthropogenic factors influence the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems. The research questions I focus on are the result of my interest in a particular ecosystem: California's Sierra Nevada. Despite the critically important ecosystem services provided by this mountain range to millions of people, many aspects of Sierra Nevada aquatic ecosystems remain poorly understood.

Mountain Lakes Research Group

We are ecologists based at the Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory who study mountain lakes, at the population, community, and ecosystem levels. Our objective is to conduct rigorous science to solve management challenges in California’s Sierra Nevada. To quantify populations, communities, and ecosystems, we employ long-term capture-mark-recapture studies, whole-lake experiments, large-scale synoptic surveys, and modern analytical approaches.

Scott Jasechko

Scott Jasechko is an Assistant Professor of Water Resources at the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Scott’s research focuses on fresh water resources and uses large datasets to understand how rain and snow transform into river water and groundwater resources. Scott is an active member of the American Geophysical Union.

Michelle O'Malley

The O'Malley Lab works at the interface of engineering and biology to engineer microbes and consortia with novel functions. We are especially interested in deciphering how “unwieldy” microbes in the environment perform extraordinary tasks - many of these microbes have no available genomic sequence and are exceptionally difficult to manipulate.

Ryoko Oono

Ryoko Oono is an evolutionary ecologist focusing on plant-microbe interactions. Dr. Oono earned her BA degree at Carleton College and her PhD in plant biology at the University of Minnesota where she studied the evolutionary stability of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. As a postdoctoral fellow of NIH’s Molecular Mycology and Pathogenesis Training Program at Duke University and NC State University, she studied foliar fungal endophytes and their relationship with pine hosts in southeastern U.S.

Matthew Hall

The Associate Vice Chancellor for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer holds the senior campus leadership position responsible for developing an institutional focus on information technologies that advance the mission and strategic goals of UC Santa Barbara. The Chief Information Officer provides oversight for all IT activities that contribute to planning, creating, and implementing a campus-wide IT vision, and for integrating them into UCSB's strategic plan.

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