Human Impacts

Mountain Lakes Research Group

We are ecologists based at the Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory who study mountain lakes, at the population, community, and ecosystem levels. Our objective is to conduct rigorous science to solve management challenges in California’s Sierra Nevada. To quantify populations, communities, and ecosystems, we employ long-term capture-mark-recapture studies, whole-lake experiments, large-scale synoptic surveys, and modern analytical approaches.

Paul Alessio

My research is rooted in understanding the mechanics of surface processes to analyze how faulting, climate change, and land-use practices affect landscape morphology and geologic hazard potential. Specifically, I study storm driven landslides and hill slope processes, sea cliff erosion and coastal processes, debris flows and land-use management. 

Current project: The influence of rilling on hill slopes and scour in stream channels, determining the rate of mud generation and total sediment budget for the 2018 Montecito Debris Flow

 

 

Roland Knapp

The general goal of my research is to understand how natural and anthropogenic factors influence the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems. The research questions I focus on are the result of my interest in a particular ecosystem: California's Sierra Nevada. Despite the critically important ecosystem services provided by this mountain range to millions of people, many aspects of Sierra Nevada aquatic ecosystems remain poorly understood.

Ranjit Deshmukh

Ranjit Deshmukh is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Studies department at the University of California Santa Barbara. Ranjit’s research interests lie at the intersection of energy, environment, and economics, specifically in low carbon energy systems, clean energy access, and electricity markets.

Debra Perrone

Debra Perrone is an Assistant Professor of UCSB’s Environmental Studies Program. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of California, Debra was a postdoctoral research scholar at Stanford University with a duel appointment in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Woods Institute for the Environment. She received her PhD in Environmental Engineering at Vanderbilt University in 2014 and was awarded first honors as the Graduate School’s Founder’s Medalist.

Ashley Larsen

Ashley Larsen’s research interests center on the ecology of managed systems. Her research incorporates theory from ecology, economics, and public health to better understand how to produce the necessary food and fiber for a growing population while maintaining healthy ecological and human communities. She seeks to provide novel understanding of ecological processes using a combination of econometric and GIS tools. Her current projects focus on understanding the landscape drivers of agricultural pests, as well as the human health consequences of pesticide exposure.

Scott Jasechko

Scott Jasechko is an Assistant Professor of Water Resources at the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Scott’s research focuses on fresh water resources and uses large datasets to understand how rain and snow transform into river water and groundwater resources. Scott is an active member of the American Geophysical Union.

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