Human Impacts

Jay Means

Over the course of his career, Jay Means has been involved in developing trace analytical methodology and its application to the analysis of environmental media including water, sediments, biological tissues, colloidal materials and air. He has published more than one hundred papers in the areas of trace analytical chemistry, environmental chemistry, and environmental toxicology of hydrophobic organic chemicals in aquatic systems ranging from the Great Lakes and major U.S. river systems to estuaries in the Chesapeake Bay, San Francisco Bay, the Gulf of Mexico, and U.S.

Snow Hydrology Research Group

The Snow Hydrology Research Group is part of the Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara. It is also a member of the ESIP Federation (Earth Science Information Partners). The primary research focus of this group is NASA's REASoN (Research, Education and Applications Solutions Network) investigation called "Multi-Resolution Snow Products for the Hydrologic Sciences." The group also works on problems of snow metamorphism, snow-climate interactions, and snowmelt runoff.

Biogeography Lab

Since 1991 the Biogeography Lab has conducted research on the ecology, distribution and conservation of species and ecosystems using field studies, geographic information systems and remote sensing.
Through our research we help planners and resource managers protect, manage and restore productive and diverse ecosystems in California, the U.S. and internationally.

CLIVAC

Welcome to the Climate Variations and Change research group. CLIVAC is headed by professor Leila Carvalho from the Department of Geography at UCSB. Leila got her BSc, MSc and PhD degrees in Meteorology at the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The behavior of our climate is governed by complex processes and interactions within the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, land, biosphere and ice. CLIVAC is dedicated to further understand the Earth's present and future climates on different temporal and spatial scales.

NEES

The NEES@UCSB facility consists of permanently-instrumented geotechnical test sites designed to improve our understanding of the effects of surface geology on strong ground motion. The instrumentation at these sites includes surface and borehole arrays of accelerometers and pore pressure transducers designed to record strong ground motions, excess pore pressure generation and liquefaction that occurs during large earthquakes. An instrumented structure is also monitored to improve our understanding of soil-foundation-structure interaction (SFSI) effects.

Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology

The UC Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN) studies the effects of nanomaterials on a range of biological systems in terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments. From this research, the UC CEIN will design a comprehensive risk-ranking model, based on the potential toxicity, mobility, and persistence of the nanomaterials. With the rapid development of nanotechnology, little is known about the possible environmental, health, and safety impacts of nanomaterials.

Sangwon Suh

Sangwon Suh’s research focuses on the sustainability of the human-nature complexity through understanding materials and energy exchanges between them. He has been working on the theoretical foundations and practical applications of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Industrial Ecology. In particular, Dr.

Andy MacDonald

Andrew MacDonald is a disease ecologist, a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Biology at Stanford University, and an Assistant Researcher at the Earth Research Institute. He received his PhD from the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology at the University of California, Santa Barbara in September 2016. His dissertation focused on the effect of land use and environmental change on tick-borne disease risk in California and the northeastern US.

Derek Booth

Derek Booth has been at the Bren School since 2011, having worked in public agencies, academia, and the private sector as a geologist and geomorphologist. His recent projects span the fields of watershed assessment and planning, stormwater management, and stream restoration. Previously, he was a research professor in the departments of Civil & Environmental Engineering and Earth & Space Sciences at the University of Washington; he retains an active position as affiliate professor in both departments.

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