Human Impacts

Thomas Dunne

Thomas Dunne conducts field and theoretical research in fluvial geomorphology and in the application of hydrology, sediment transport, and geomorphology to landscape management and hazard analysis. He has worked in many parts of the world, including Kenya, where he studied the effects of land use on hill-slope erosion and river-basin sedimentation, and how climate and hydrology affect long-term hill-slope evolution. At the University of Washington, he focused on land sliding and debris flows, as well as tephra erosion and debris-flow sedimentation resulting from the eruption of Mount St.

Jeff Dozier

Jeff Dozier has been on the UCSB faculty since 1974 and was the founding dean of the Bren School. He has led interdisciplinary studies in two areas: one addresses hydrologic science, environmental engineering, and social science in the water environment; the other is in the integration of environmental science and remote sensing with computer science and technology.

Frank Davis

Frank Davis brings conservation science and geographical analysis to bear in land use planning and the conservation of wild species. Davis heads the Biogeography Lab at the Bren School and his research focuses on the landscape ecology of California plant communities; the design of protected-area networks; rangeland and farmland conservation; and the biological implications of regional climate change.

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