Natural Hazards

Paul Alessio

My research is rooted in understanding the mechanics of surface processes to analyze how faulting, climate change, and land-use practices affect landscape morphology and geologic hazard potential. Specifically, I study storm driven landslides and hill slope processes, sea cliff erosion and coastal processes, debris flows and land-use management. 

Current project: The influence of rilling on hill slopes and scour in stream channels, determining the rate of mud generation and total sediment budget for the 2018 Montecito Debris Flow

 

 

Greg Husak

Greg has been working with the Climate Hazards Group since its inception, starting as a graduate student and now as Assistant Researcher and Principal Investigator. Greg received his MA from UCSB looking at global landcover maps under Dr. Jack Estes. This Masters research led him to the FEWS NET work, and satellite estimates of rainfall. His PhD work focused on developing statistical tools for leveraging existing products to provide improved rainfall monitoring and forecasting.

Zachary Eilon

My research covers several aspects of structural seismology, with a focus on answering fundamental questions about tectonic processes using seismic tools. I have worked on research projects in Papua New Guinea, Iceland, Greece, Cascadia, and Ethiopia. My primary areas of expertise are seismic tomography, anisotropy, and attenuation.

Kelly Caylor

Dr. Caylor's research addresses the coupled feedbacks between terrestrial vegetation and surface hydrological dynamics, with a focus on the causes and consequences of spatial patterns in plants and their accompanying root systems within water-limited landscapes. The research approach integrates theoretical development, field observations, and simulation modeling to develop new insight into the complex ecohydrological controls on water balance in water-limited landscapes. Dr.

Qinghua Ding

Qinghua Ding received his Ph.D from the University of Hawaii in 2008. His Ph.D work was to understand the Asian monsoon variability over the last 60 years and its linkage with the global circulation variability. In 2010, he started to work at University of Washington as Research Associate on developing an isotope-enabled global climate model and understanding the recent climate change in the Arctic and Antarctic from the perspective of climate dynamics. He found that the recent warming trend in the Arctic and Antarctic is partly attributed to a tropical SST-related natural variability.

Max Moritz

Much of my work is focused on understanding the dynamics of fire regimes at relatively broad scales and applying this information in ecosystem management. We use quantitative analyses of fire history, examining the relative importance of different mechanisms that drive fire patterns on the landscape, to develop a variety of fire models. Research in my lab ranges from local to global scales, and we have recently published new projections of fire activity under climate change scenarios.

Robin Matoza

Our group uses seismic and infrasonic waves to investigate how volcanoes work. Infrasound is atmospheric sound with frequencies below 20 Hz, the lower frequency limit of human hearing. With seismology, we study magmatic, hydrothermal, and faulting processes occurring within and around volcanoes. With infrasound, we study the mechanisms and dynamics of explosive eruptions and shallow volcanic degassing. This work is focused on understanding the geophysical signatures of volcanic unrest and eruption, with application in monitoring and mitigating volcanic hazards.

Bodo Bookhagen

Understanding Quaternary climate change, geomorphic processes, landscape evolution, and tectonic processes through integrated studies involving cosmogenic radionuclide dating, recent and past climatic records, remote sensing, numerical modeling, and field observations

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